General Obedience training

Here are a few simple commands that you can teach your dog. These are the simple basic ones, if you are not sure please give me a call to organise a training session. Whilst these commands are the basic 'Primary School' commands for your dog, it is important that you start out correctly in terms of timing and that you learn to identify when your dog is getting tired. Just like people dogs can get frustrated if you try and push them to quickly. That then sets the concept of training as unpleasant for your dog and they will begin to dislike training. 

 Why train sit?

Every dog should have one command she can do anywhere, anytime. Sit is a great contender for that job. It gives your dog a way to say, “Please,” and can become her default greeting, which stops her from jumping on people.

How to train it.

Step 1. Show it. Lure your dog into a sit by putting the treat up to her nose and slowly moving the treat backwards and up. Keep the treat lure close to your dog’s nose—if you move your hand up too quickly or too far away from her mouth, she may give up and lose interest.

Step 2. Pay it. As soon as your dog’s hindquarters hit the ground praise and treat. Repeat as many times as you can, so long as you and your dog are still enjoying yourselves. Praise and treat every sit.

Step 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 many times.

Step 4. Say it. Hold a treat in your hand. Tell your dog, “Sit” in a cheerful tone of voice. As soon as your dog’s hindquarters hit the ground, praise and treat. Continue to treat, after a few seconds tell him "Okay" and release him.

Step 5. Repeat it. Repeat Step 4 many times. When your dog sits reliably, it is time to take the treat out of your hand and use the verbal cue alone. If your dog makes a mistake, first try luring without the treat. Only put the treat back in your hand if all else fails.

Why train down?

Down is a great command for dogs that need to learn to relax in one place for long periods of time. It is also excellent for jumpy dogs because jumping up from a down is harder than from a sit. And lying down can be helpful for big dogs by making them less intimidating when meeting children or people nervous around dogs.

 How to train it.

Step 1. Show it. Lure your dog into a down by putting the treat up to his nose and slowly moving the treat down to the ground. Keep the treat close to your dog’s nose—if you move your hand down too quickly or too far away from his mouth he may give up and lose interest.

Step 2. Pay it. As soon as your dog’s knees and elbows hit the ground, praise and treat. Keep treating him to thank him for staying in the down. After a few seconds tell him, “Okay!” and encourage him to get up. If he gets up before you release him, say, “Ah-ah” and ask him to lie back down. Release him more quickly this time, then keep practicing to work up to longer downs.

Step 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 many times.

Step 4. Say it. Hold a treat in your hand. Tell your dog, “Down” in a cheerful tone of voice. As soon as your dog’s knees and elbows hit the ground, praise and treat. Continue to treat, after a few seconds tell him "Okay" and release him.

Step 5. Repeat it. Repeat step 4 many times. When your dog gets into the down quickly, it is time to take the treat out of your hand and use the verbal cue alone. If your dog makes a mistake, first try luring without the treat. Only put the treat back in your hand if all else fails.